Wednesday, June 28, 2017

How to Mislead Readers


Check out Eduardo Porter's article on US health care in today's NY Times.  It is completely misleading and, no doubt, designed to deliberately mislead it's readers.  This is becoming commonplace in the NY Times.

The article is about health care in the United States and compares US outcomes to those in other countries.  For example, obesity is one of the "health care" problems.

Porter writes as if  "obesity" is some kind of medical problem that can only be dealt with by constant trips to the doctor and to the hospital. Apparently, Professor Porter thinks obesity just happens. It's something that individual habits have nothing to do with.  If one person is not overweight and is healthy, but another is not, the reason, suggested by Porter, is that the first person has a doctor or a hospital nearby, while the other does not.

Exactly what the finest doctors and hospitals can do to prevent "obesity" is not clear, but Porter's analysis suggests that lack of doctors and hospitals is the main cause of obesity.  Is there anyone out there that believes that?

As is well known in the health care field, the availability of doctors and hospitals is not the most important determinant of health outcomes.  Personal habits, diet and so forth are far, far more important than availability of medical facilities.  That is well known, but, apparently, Professor Porter has no knowledge of this.  Makes you wonder why the NY Times picked him to write about a subject of which the most important facts are unknown to him.

I think we all know the reason for Professor Porter's duplicity and for that of the NY Times.  In the rush to expand government's control over everyone's daily life, the NY Times will say or do anything, irrespective of truth or relevance.


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